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Amnesty’s Unanswered Questions


On June 15, 2012 Obama announced he will unilaterally, without authorization from Congress,
permit hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants to remain in U.S.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has explained how they will enforce this new policy.

The new policy will apply to any individual who satisfies all of the following:

1. Came to the United States under the age of sixteen;

2. Has continuously resided in the United States for at least five years preceding June 15, 2012 and is present in the United States on June 15, 2012;

3. Was in school on June 15, 2012, has graduated from high school, has obtained a general education development certificate, or is an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;

4. Has not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanor offenses, or otherwise poses a threat to national security or public safety;

5. Is not above the age of thirty.

The policy applies to undocumented illegals. Unlike your cocker spaniel, “undocumented” means they have no papers.

When such undocumented aliens show up later to seek a permit to stay, how will DHS answer the following questions?

1. How old is the alien? It is unlikely any of them carried a birth certificate when passing through the barbed wire.

2. When did they arrive? Without knowing their age and when they arrived, how will DHS determine they arrived before age 16?

3. When they show up later, how will DHS know they were here on June 15, 2012 and were here for at least five years?

4. With no identification how will DHS determine they graduated from high school, obtained a general education development certificate, or is an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States?

5. With no identification how will DHS determine they have not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, or multiple misdemeanor offenses either somewhere here or in their home country?

6. How will DHS decide if they pose a threat to national security or public safety?

Considering the administration’s desire to let them all in, perhaps they will just give them a simple form to sign and tell them to check the following boxes;

[ ] I was under the age of sixteen when I came to the United States.
[ ] I have continuously resided in the United States for at least five years preceding June 15, 2012.
[ ] I was present in the United States on June 15, 2012.
[ ] I was in school on June 15, 2012, or I graduated from high school, or I obtained a general education development certificate, or I am an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States.
[ ] I have not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanor offenses, or otherwise poses a threat to national security or public safety.
[ ] I am not above the age of thirty.

That will save DHS the effort of having to authoritatively determine the eligibility. After all, they surely can be trusted. Would anyone who went to all that trouble to get here actually misrepresent themselves?

NO MORE QUESTIONS

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